Hemp vs. Marijuana Derived Cannabinoids: Are they the same thing?

The short answer is yes. CBD is CBD, whether from marijuana or hemp. Marijuana is high in the chemical compound tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, which causes the “high” feeling. However, marijuana is usually very low in other non-psychoactive cannabinoids, such as CBD and CBG, making hemp the preferable option.

Here’s why.

CBD comes from Cannabis sativa L, an annual herbaceous flowering plant. Cannabis sativa L. is the plant species, and does not mean our products will have the sativa like effects typically associated with those strains of marijuana. The indica and sativa distinction does not have as much bearing on the plant’s effects without the presence of THC. Cannabis Sativa, Cannabis Indica, and Cannabis Ruderalis are all subspecies of Cannabis Sativa L. Our hemp extract is made with cultivars that are bred with approximately 70% sativa and 30% indica genetics.

In addition to CBD, Cannabis sativa L contains organic compounds called terpenes. Terpenes are isomeric hydrocarbons (C10H16) used to create essential oils, balsams, and other by-products. When chemically modified through oxidation or other methods, terpenes become terpenoids (sometimes referred to as isoprenoids). Vitamin A is one example of a terpenoid.

Across all strains, Cannabis sativa L. plants contain 120 identified terpene compounds. These terpenes exist within the resin found on hemp or marijuana flowers. The scent produced by the terpenes helps to determine the quality of each particular cannabis plant strain. It also influences taste, feel, and other senses affected by interaction with the plant or its by-products.

As explained in “Terpene synthases from Cannabis sativa,” a report published by researchers Judith K. Booth, Jonathan E. Page, and Jörg Bohlmann, CBD is a class of terpenophenolic metabolites; These are organic compounds made in part by terpenes and natural phenols.

The interactions between terpenes and cannabinoids vary across Cannabis plant strains and each plant produces unique properties.

Booth, Page, and Bohlmann give the example of sesquiterpene β-caryophyllene. This terpene interacts with mammalian cannabinoid receptors. Effects may change based on the blend of cannabinoid and terpene. It is proposed that terpenes provide unique benefits when combined with cannabinoid-rich hemp supplements

For our products, we use CBD oil that is extracted from hemp, a legal plant low in THC. The USDA defines industrial hemp as any part or derivative of Cannabis sativa L. with no more than 0.3% THC concentration on a dry-weight basis. This definition applies to both seeds, fibers, and other derivatives of Cannabis sativa L.

As noted in the report by Booth, Page, and Bohlmann, various strains of cannabis plants produce terpenes differently. Commonly, hemp plants contain less terpene-rich resin than marijuana plants. The amount of resin found in hemp plants, however, does not affect the quality of CBD that we obtain from them. In fact, hemp plants are a far better source of CBD than marijuana plants.

Furthermore, our farms grow hemp plant strains that contain higher terpene content than other hemp plants. While marijuana plants indeed contain relatively high amounts of terpene-rich resin, the hemp plants we use are equally endowed.